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A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 11:29 am
by pipemakermike
Actually a musette duet from the Iphone of Francis
The tune is by one of the Chédeville brothers from around 1740
la missisipy.jpg
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Note that the tune is notated in the old French clef having G on the bottom line!

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2011 9:25 am
by RobSay
Synchronicity strikes again .. I played that very duet with a musette de cour back in April. Playing in C in on the F chanter produces the scale of Bb which after a bit of reed tweaking matched his instrument. It was an interesting experience we played a couple of 'contredanse' as well

It works quite well off the page but needed some adjustment - the top notes are C which I don't have. The Musette played the main line and I altered the second to fit the chanter. If I recall correctly it was mostly playing low G in place of top C - I'm not sure this would work as well on the main theme since you'd lose the descending arpeggio which is the character of the B part...

cheers

Rob

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:40 am
by Francis Wood
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Here's a transposition in G which should suit most NSPs.

The unusual and interesting title reflects the time when a huge area in America was named after the French king, Louis XIV.
The piece itself is a charming but fairly regular example of a hunting melody, conventionally in 6/8.

Francis

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 4:18 am
by Brynley
Is there any evidence of musette de cour being played in New France ? It seems to be a bit of a mystery that pipes didn,t seem to make it out to the colony. Thank you for the adaptation for NSP .Are there any specific publications or links where I can find more music for musette de cour that might suit NSP,s , and information on the instrument? Thanks

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 5:46 pm
by John Gibbons
Does Francois Dubois have enough musette tunes + duets hidden away, suitable for NSP, to make a real or virtual tunebook?

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2011 8:40 pm
by Francis Wood
John Gibbons wrote:Does Francois Dubois have enough musette tunes + duets hidden away, suitable for NSP, to make a real or virtual tunebook?


François Dubois has indeed assembled a good number of musette duets which he intends to publish soon as a real tunebook for the use of NSP players. He offers this item as a foretaste.

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2011 11:52 pm
by Brynley
Merci Francois Dubois, (et messieurs Aubert et Wood), for this "lazy" tease of things to come! As well as being curious about whether the musette de cour was played in New France and the colonies, I,m also wondering about the Scottish/border connection, there,s the musette in the museum , supposedly belonging to Bonnie Prince Charlie, and a few pieces of music from the Sutherland collection, and others, showing some linkage, but I,m not finding much info on the subject, other than the theory that the musette influenced the makers of the Union/Pastoral and Northumbrian pipes, and that there were musettes floating around the north at some point. Any scholars out there with some insight?

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 3:00 am
by Brynley
I finally figured out how to get this file small enough to post. These are some of the aforementioned tunes from the Sutherland collection, from Ross's Music page, three minuets, that I,m guessing would have been picked up from" wandering" musette players of the era. They are nicely in the range of NSP,s anyway, and sound well on them to my ear. Ross Anderson also has written an interesting article about the Sutherland manuscript, and mentions the Irish ,Scots, Northumbrian, and Italian influences in the repertoire, but doesn't mention a French connection, so my guess may be off.

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 1:13 am
by Brynley
Not to belabor this subject on a board dedicated to trad NSP playing :o , but I have another question that hopefully may be answered by some knowledgeable person. Concerning French baroque ornamentation as marked in the pieces in this thread, + = a trill beginning on the upper auxiliary, (I've got that one!) but as for, V = port de voix, I,m not having much luck finding out how this one should be played, I've looked at the explanation in Hottere's method book for musette, but my French isn't up to it, and there isn't a notated example. Anyone know?

Re: A smallpipe duet for our colonial cousins

PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:28 pm
by John Gibbons
I think a port de voix is French for an appoggiatura - a stressed dissonant note resolving usually down (sometimes up) to the one below (above).
It normally takes more time than the melody note it resolves to. So a dotted minim G with this marking might be played A2G.

John