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Re: Dixon tune notation

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:39 pm
by John Gibbons
In the absence of a BP fingering chart from the 1730s, we can only speculate.
But many (most?) early fiddle transcriptions (Mr Preston, Bold Wilkinson, Wat ye what I got late Yestreen...)
of 'obviously BP' tunes are Dorian not Mixolydian mode, say in A with a c nat.
This is not the pitch that comes with modern fingering of the 4-finger note, now giving c# -
so perhaps the fingering was different then? At least some fiddlers thought the third was flatter.

But a lot of the Dixon figures lie well under the fingers nowadays -
and even with the problematic c#dec#, crossing noises are avoidable with practice.


John

Re: Dixon tune notation

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 7:45 pm
by adrian
Crumhorn music! I've said this before when looking at Matt's book, 9 notes that.....In that book, there are strange signs above the notes that are not known in the bagpipe world.

Re: Dixon tune notation

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:01 pm
by John Gibbons
The only strange signs I've seen in (bits of) Dixon, are double dashes over notes -
this was a notation for an ornament in Atkinson too.
HA had different styles of double dash, but lord knows what different styles of ornament this might mean,
or whether it is just variations in his handwriting from one bar to the next.
Perhaps upper or lower mordent? It is hard to guess from the musical context.
I don't know if there is more than one style of ornament mark in Dixon - I haven't seen evidence that there is.

John

Re: Dixon tune notation

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 11:29 pm
by adrian
Some Crumhorns have a 9 note scale: f,g to G. and there are more candidates too, Shawms etc. The Crumhorn has a cylinderical bore and the reed looks very much like a NSP reed, except for the staple length.

Re: Dixon tune notation

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 11:59 pm
by John Gibbons
Most bagpipes are just a shawm in a stock - plus or minus drones and sophistication....

Few major exceptions of which NSP is the most important.

John